Monday, October 06, 2014

Agenbite of Inwit

The odyssey is finally over.

The sheer comedy of the first chapter,
The confidence I felt after reading the second chapter that I could read this book after all,
The mist and mud that I footslogged during the third chapter, which after finishing taught me the pleasure of going into the mind of the characters,
Meeting the deeply satisfied Mr. Bloom and walking with him during his not-so-exciting morning routine, which ends with him defecating delightfully in the fourth chapter,
Walking through Dublin during a jolly summer day and feeling every bit of it in the fifth chapter,
Reflecting about death and life in the sixth chapter,
Feeling the rush and the pace of modern publishing in the seventh chapter,
Tasting that gorgonzola sandwich with Bloom in the eighth chapter,
Listening to the exciting Shakespeare theory of Stephen in the ninth chapter,
Feeling like the holy ghost and visiting the minds of the people of Dublin in the tenth chapter,
Listening to the music and sounds of a full restaurant in the eleventh chapter,
Understanding sources of Bloom's feeling of rejection in the twelfth chapter,
Wandering cautiously into the female mind and the naughty parts of the male mind in the thirteenth chapter,
Trying to make progress in the linguistic puzzle of the fourteenth chapter,
Getting my mind literally blown of in the best chapter of the book, the fifteenth,
Getting a rest in the sixteenth chapter,
Laughing as loud as I can in the seventeenth chapter,
And falling asleep with Penelope and affirming all sides of life with a yes and yes and yesin the eighteenth chapter,

are experiences that I will never forget. I haven't had this kind of experience since Martin Eden in my high school years, The Island of the Day Before in my university years, Kafka and Dostoyevsky of PHD years.

I am planning to read the book again with the annotations:

http://www.amazon.de/Ulysses-Annotated-Notes-James-Joyces/dp/0520253973

and recommend everyone not to be intimidated by what they read about Ulysses and read this magnificent book with the help of this accompaniment:

http://www.amazon.de/The-New-Bloomsday-Book-International/dp/0415138582

Finally, I will let Stephen Fry do the rest of the convincing for me:

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